Itespresso.fr : Facebook, la porte d’entrée de la cyberattaque à l’Elysée ?

La cyberattaque de l’Elysée du printemps proviendrait des Etats-Unis à des fins d’espionnage et Facebook aurait servi de tremplin.

Une rumeur qui circule depuis un certain temps et à laquelle L’Express donne du crédit dans sa dernière édition.

Mais sans vraiment la confirmer que ce soit du côté des autorités françaises ou du côté des Etats-Unis.

Tout porterait sur des « faisceaux convergents d’informations recoupées ».

Le magazine a décortiqué l’attaque informatique qui a visé le Palais de la Présidence survenue entre les deux tours de l’élection présidentielle.

L’approche « social engineering » pour s’infiltrer serait assez simple : les assaillants auraient identifié sur Facebook des collaborateurs travaillant à l’Elysée.Facebook, la porte d’entrée de la cyberattaque à l’Elysée ?.

Fakebook: Create educational games and quizzes

« Fakebook » allows teachers and students to create imaginary profile pages for study purposes.

Use « Fakebook » to chart the plot of a book, the development of a character, a series of historical events, the debates and relationships between people, and so on!

Get started by entering a name at the top of the page. Then proceed to add friends, posts, comments and profile information.

You can save your work and edit it again later.

Fakebook: homepage. Create educational games and quizzes at classtools.net

Study: Professors Like Social Media More Than Other Education Technology | Edudemic

Do you view Facebook as a teaching tool? Do college professors use it for educational purposes? An infographic from Schools.com takes a look at a recent study by Babson Survey Research Group and Pearson that shows about 91% of college faculty use social media as part of their job. This is in sharp contrast to other industries where just 47% of employees use social media as part of their work. While there are obviously reasons for this difference (some don’t have easy access or time to computers, etc.), the difference is quite large.

The big question raised by the infographic is: 70% of faculty believe that video, podcasts, blogs, and wikis are valuable tools for teaching. I’m surprised that this is so low, to be honest.

viaStudy: Professors Like Social Media More Than Other Education Technology | Edudemic.

Présence des bibliothèques sur Facebook (URFIST) « Intelligence scientifique & Veille

Présence des bibliothèques sur Facebook (URFIST)

Impressionnante présentation par Alain Marois pour l’URFIST de Rennes

viaPrésence des bibliothèques sur Facebook (URFIST) « Intelligence scientifique & Veille.

Facebook helps, hinders high school reunions | eSchool News

Paula Sokol and some classmates tried a few times to arrange a 30-year reunion this year for their Sacred Heart High School Class of 1981, yet their attempts fell through. On one planned date, only a handful of people showed up.

Sokol, 47, of Morningside, Pa., said she felt disappointed by the lack of her classmates’ enthusiasm for a reunion. She sensed that people’s involvement on Facebook—the popular social-networking site with more than 800 million active users—dampened many people’s interest, because they already were in touch and caught up with classmates.

How, she thought, could an online connection replace seeing people in person?

viaFacebook helps, hinders high school reunions | eSchool News.